Fueling Youth Athletes in Under 500 Words

Back to the basics! There is no magic meal or diet that will “win games”. If you want to be a better athlete listen up. Consume 3-4 high-quality meals with 2 to 3 snacks in between to support health and optimal performance. Discourage from trying new foods on game day or more intense training days when training duration and load are greater. Post-training meal is key to support recovery and training.  Simplify the science and empower your athletes to follow the “25-50-30 rule”.

addition to two to three snacks for better focus academically, mentally, and physically. Not skipping meals and fueling up can help increase performance, strength, performance adaptations, decrease the risk of injuries, and on-set fatigue. More on building a high-performance plate can be assessed here.

Nutrient timing 101 Nutrient timing can Consume 25 grams of protein paired with 50 grams of carbohydrates within 30 minutes of activity for reducing muscle breakdown and supporting training adaptations. More information on recovery nutrition here.

Don’t skip breakfast

Nutrients and calories missed at breakfast by teens are unlikely to be made up for later in the day. Grab-and-go options; hard boiled-egg and fruit, string cheese, banana, Greek yogurt parfait, whole-grain oats, berries, or a whole-grain turkey bagel sandwich. More breakfast ideas to share with young athletes can be found here. Bowls filled with granola and berries

A second breakfast can satisfy energy needs during high-volume and intense training phases or for weight gain. For example, incorporating chocolate milk, peanut butter sandwich, nuts, and seeds with string cheese can help increase calories and nutrition. For additional guidance on fueling your athletes check out this article on practical tips to fueling young athletes as a strength coach.

Hydration is one of the most undervalued performance enhancers available. Water is vital to peak performance. A rule of thumb I encourage is 1 ounce of water per pound of body weight per day. Invest in a good water bottle for your teen athlete to keep on hand. For every pound lost during training, the athlete should replace it with 16-24 oz. of fluid.

A bedtime snack containing 15-20 grams of protein and 30 grams of carbohydrates for restful sleep and growing lean muscle tissue during the night. Cottage cheese, milk, and yogurt are rich in slow-digesting protein. Pair an 8 oz. serving of cottage cheese with sliced bananas for a high-protein, high-magnesium bedtime snack. Magnesium helps relax muscles and lowers brain temperature to regulate hormones.

Eat the Rainbow. Fruits and veggies contain quality nutrients needed for optimal growth and development. The more pigment and color in an athlete’s diet the healthier the immune system they will have that will fight off the risk of infection, illness, and support long-term health.

Whole meals first supplement second. Supplements are meant to satisfy small gaps in nutrition and to avoid nutrient deficiencies. Good nutritional habits must be established first. For additional guidance to ensure your athletes are meeting their protein and carbohydrate needs check out this article. No supplement can replace whole foods.

In good health,

Wendi Irlbeck, MS, RDN

Wendi Irlbeck, MS, RDN, is a registered dietitian nutritionist, and performance coach. Wendi utilizes evidence-based science to tailor nutrition programs for athletes to optimize performance, minimize health risks, and enhance recovery from training while focusing on injury prevention. She partners with parents, sports performance staff, and special needs and recreational athletes to offer nutritional guidance and optimal athletic performance and lifestyle plans. Wendi provides virtual services including telehealth but based in Grand Rapids, Michigan. Wendi works with clients of all levels and ages across the US as well as Canada and the UK. You can find more about Wendi and scheduling an appointment with her on her website.

What can hiring a sports nutritionist offer your program? Learn more here.

 

Testimonials of Wendi’s expertise from colleges, coaches, parents, young athletes, and high school administrators can be found at the testimonial link on her website. You can also follow Wendi on TwitterFacebook, and Instagram for more nutrition information. Service

The Performance Training and Nutrition Menu for Athletes Desiring to Make the Jump from Good to Great!

The Performance Training and Nutrition Menu for Beast Athletes

Let me ask you this: as an athlete, when do you feel at your BEST?

When do you feel your most empowered? Your strongest? Your most energized? Your healthiest? Your most resilient?

When do you feel ready to step on the field with confidence and tenacity?

Let me dive deeper: what exactly are you doing when you feel at your BEST?

Are you doing your workouts? Are you training with intensity transferable to the game? Are you tracking your progress? Are you hydrating? Are you filling your body with nutrients and whole foods?


Or are you missing workouts? Are you training at a slow pace that won’t sustain in the game? Are you not competing with yourself? Are you rolling your eyes at the thought of a strength workout? Are you “forgetting” to hydrate? Are you eating toxic sludge?

Before my friend and amazing dietician, Wendi Irbeck, talks nutrition for performance, I want to get into the physical training aspect first.

Right now, there are no excuses to miss workouts and train half-heartedly, unless you have a real emergency.

But for everyone else who has good health, a safe family, a roof, a home gym fancier than my facility, and a front yard the size of a soccer field, there are no excuses to not do your strength and conditioning workouts.

Sports are canceled, so what are you doing to prepare to be your best when they return?

What do you look like and act like when you are training at your BEST? How do you envision yourself stepping back onto the field?

They’re deep questions, but get a paper and pencil and start writing your thoughts.

It’s critical to become AWARE.

Returning to play as the player you were before the quarantine began is going to be immensely hard. And it’s going to take a grind harder than you can imagine. I’m not going to beat around the bush.

And no amount of HIIT circuits on the web are going to prepare you. No amount of bodyweight workouts are going to bulletproof you against the change of direction, fatiguing muscle actions in the game that cause ACL injury. No amount of jump squat, burpee and push-up tests are going to train your nervous system how to sprint FAST again.

Even though the world has come to a stop, strength and conditioning programming based off of science has not.

Too, it’s important to remember this:

– Athletes now have time to really improve the physical components of their game: speed, power, and conditioning. Practices and games aren’t in the way anymore.

– Athletes now have time to hone in on correct and safe movement patterns for a healthier return to play, and seek out professionals to help.

– Athletes now have time to lean into the power of exercise and strength training for mental health and immunity.

There’s no excuse.

To that end, athletes who care deeply about playing at a high level will show their true colors right now. Do they truly love the game? Are they committed? Can they adapt when adversity strikes?

I’m speaking to you: if you want to earn your stripes as a high level athlete, let’s see how well you rise above the chaos during a global pandemic.


I’ll take you seriously when you can attack adversity and use it as a means to become better.

Don’t take this out of context, though. I’m not totally insensitive to the emotional storm now.

I get everyone is anxious, scared, sad, depressed, worried. I get it, I experienced it, my loved ones are going through it, and I want to be considerate.

Collectively, yes, the world is freaking out.

And I’m speaking to you, coaches: if you want to earn your stripes as a coach, let’s see how much you hold your players accountable for their physical health and care for them with a smooth return to play.

Truthfully, I would be a terrible coach to kids who want to perform at a high level if I didn’t encourage them to continue to train like the amazing athletes they are during this time. It’s a win-win to move, get better, improve speed times, get stronger, and keep routine. No going through the motions.

Athletes thrive on goal setting, routine, and working hard toward something meaningful. 


Okay, okay. I’ll step off my soapbox.

I do want to provide actionable items for the athletes and coaches who do not have access to a comprehensive strength and conditioning program, and help people piece this all together with minimal thinking and stress.

I’m happy to take everyone through a sample week menu with video links and sets and reps. It is going to be similar to an off-season program that focuses on general strength, power, speed and conditioning, then progresses to specific in the next couple months as we approach sports starting back up again.


 

Day 1: Total Body Strength

Slow Bird Dog 2×15 each
Lateral Mini Band Walks 2×20 each
Heel Hold 2×30 sec each
Clock Jab Steps 2×15 each

Slow Box Squat 3×6
Snap Down 1×5
Mini Vertical Jump 2×5


Pull-Up 3×10
Lateral Lunge 2×8 each
SL Deadlift 2×15 each

Pallof Hold 2×30 sec each
Plank Walkout 2×30 sec

Day 2: Linear Speed and Conditioning

Dynamic WU (10 minutes – aerobic zone)

Linear Skipping and Ladders (7 minutes continuous – aerobic zone)
Forward March
Forward Skipx20ydx2
2 Out 2 Inx3
Icky Shuffle Skp Boxx3
High Kneesx3
2 Out 2 In Skip Box3

Acceleration Leans 1×10 each (focus on loading ball of foot, shoulders past hips, back arm extended)
Kneeling Accelerations 10-yard x4 (45 second rest)
Feet Chopping Sprints 20-yard x3 (2 minute rest)
Bunny Hop Sprints 30-yard x3 (2 minute rest)

Day 3: Total Body Strength
Dead Bug 2×10 each
Jab Steps 2×15 each
Slow Bird Dog 2×15 each
Multi-Directional Band Walks 2×20

Dumbbell Deadlift 3×6
Snap Down 1×5
Broad Jump 1×5 (measured, stick landing, record distance from best of 5 reps)

Pull-Up
Banded Good Morning
Glute Bridge Floor Press

Hollow Hold
Side Plank Leg Raise
Body Saw
Pallof Circle

Day 4: Lateral Speed and Agility
Dynamic WU (10 minutes – aerobic zone)

Lateral Skipping and Ladders (7 minutes continuous – aerobic zone)
Lateral Skipx20ydx2 each
Lateral Ladder High Kneesx2 each
2 Step Patternx2 each
3 Step Patternx2 each
Scissor Kickersx2 each

Side Shuffle Technique with Hold x5 each, 5 second hold

Side Shuffle to 30-yard sprint x 6 (3 each) (2 minute rest)
Lateral Footwork to 40-yard sprint x 2 (1 each) (2 minute rest)



Day 5: Total Body Strength
Glute Bridge Abduction
Slow Bird Dog
Controlled Mountain Climber

Goblet Split Squat
Lateral Bounding

Pull-Up
Single Leg Deadlift Hold
Reverse Lunge

Renegade Row Push-Up
Hip Bridge

Plank X Crunch
Side Plank Band Row
Reverse Crunch


Day 6: Aerobic + Return to Functioning Human

(10 minutes on clock continuous)

Forward Skipx20yard
Lateral Skipx20 yard
Circular Skipx20 yard
Forward Crawlx20 yard
Lateral Crawlx20 yard
Circular Crawlx1 clockwise, 1 counterclockwise
Cross Crawl Marchx20 yard


Day 7: Netflix and Chill

8 hours x AMRAP 



Kidding. ;-O


So there you are. Have at it and enjoy this sample for a few weeks (I’d say up to 2 weeks, then you need to begin to tweak the sets/reps, progress intensity, learn how to absorb and create force, and put yourself in conditioning drills at a higher intensity than the game to provide a physiological adaptation). But start here and see how you do. Remember, general —-> specific.

Done correctly and considering you aren’t skipping workouts, you are good on volume and should be gassed after these workouts. Not depleted nor destroyed, but feeling like you accomplished a tough training session like a high level athlete.

I’ll have Wendi take it away with how to work in proper nutrition to make the most of an off-season menu like this, and return to the field feeling empowered and at your best physically. Nutrition plays a major role in the success of these workouts and the intensity, as well as energy you bring to them.

Eat. And fuel up.

Enjoy.

Well…that is one tough act to follow! Well done, Erica and well said! Now that you have some guidance on training from the expert herself, let’s talk about the other 16 hours of the day outside of sleep. Controlling what you put in your mouth to support overall health and performance. So let’s stir it all together!

Erica has really provided the framework for a consistent conditioning and workout program which should be supported by sufficient energy. I will address some of the specifics in greater detail below. Typically, the off-season is the period from December and January to May, June or even July when soccer athletes are fending for themselves. This time is best spent relaxing and disconnecting from the soccer world to “decompress”. As highly competitive athletes we all need rest and our brains and bodies need a break to support recovery to continue building. However, eating and fueling well along with staying active as Erica so thoroughly illustrated in the stated workouts above is important. Eating a variety of real foods, yes real foods, not supplements is critical during this time to help maintain condition, strength and endurance. overlooked piece of the puzzle or a missed opportunity to improve by young players.  The goals of this “off-season” sample can be represented below:

  •  Account for the differences in training, lifestyle and of course the unprecedented times we find ourselves in, the Novel Covid-19 Pandemic if you will. It’s important nutrient intake is adjusted but also sufficient to support the “off-season” activity.
  •  Acknowledge body composition changes in which weight may fluctuate and that is OKAY! The off-season is a great time to focus on your individual progress and any body comp changes that may be necessary would be a great opportunity to consult with a registered dietitian. An under-fueled low-energy athlete cannot build or maintain muscle mass or size, so nutrition remains critical during this time.
  • Create a solid equilibrium between training volume and nutritional intake.

 

Nutrition with Wendi Fueling Fundamentals for Off-Season:

Intent: Focus on fueling to support your training objectives. Which may include strength gains, improving focus, speed, endurance and decreasing risk of injury.

Quality nutrients: Your plate should contain all the essential components of the plate. Colorful fruits, veggies, whole grains, lean protein and healthy fats. Proper nutrition will provide you the sustained energy to help you recover from training and provide satiety between meals.

Quantity: Optimal training requires sufficient energy (calories) to support growth, development, and overall energy needs during training.

Timing: Balance your meals with snacks to ensure you’re feeling appropriately. Post-workouts and training should contain a protein and carbohydrate to support recovery and performance adaptations.

Consistency: Consuming consistent meals, snacks and overall calories to support your growth and performance is vital. There are no magic meals to bolster athletic performance. Games won are in the off-season where nutrition is prioritized. Another key to consistency is finding what works well for you and your training. Never try a new meal on a heavy or intense training day. That stands true for game day. Never experiment with new foods, as they risk stomach pain, digestive challenges and can hinder performance.

Hydration: Fluids are essential for optimal health and athletic performance. You need about 80-100 oz. of fluid per day to support the transportation of essential nutrients to your muscles and organs. Water is key for keeping our joints fluid, muscle contraction and overall focus. A drop in 1-2% of your total body weight can result in declines in your performance ranging from cognition, muscle contraction, speed and overall fatigue. For every pound lost around training, replace with 16 to 24 oz. of fluid.

 

So, as you’re learning nutrition plays a pivotal role in your health and performance. Nutrition is truly a tool to support the overall maintenance and strength of your body, which is a machine. Your plate should reflect your health and performance goals.

Every meal ,include:

  •  Fat
  •  Lean protein
  • Carbohydrate
  • Water/and or serving of dairy

This is what is referred to as the performance plate.

To perform at your best, it’s important to eat the rainbow and get a balance from most IF NOT ALL food groups at every meal. The size of those portions may increase or decrease provided the season. For this specific article, we are in the off-season, so additional whole grains or carbs may not be necessary. However, eating for health and fueling for activity requires the right amount. What does that look like roughly? For girls, that can be anywhere from 2400-3000 kcal per day and boys 2800-3500 kcal per day. In each hour soccer athletes can burn up to 500-700 kcal per hour.

Nutrition with Wendi Quick Nutrition Tips:

  • Eat breakfast every day, non-negotiable.
  • Eat real food, prioritize nutrients from whole foods instead of supplements.
  •  Do not skip meals – all meals matter.
  • Assess hunger, if you’re hungry post-meal, load up on more veggies!
  •  Drink plenty of fluids (80-100 oz.).
  •  Always reach for baked, grilled, steamed, broiled, roasted and never fried.
  • To ensure good sleep avoid high-fat, spicy or overly large meals prior to bed.
  • Eat the rainbow, focus on lean proteins, quality fats and fluids at each meal.
  • Consume quality nutrients every 2-3 hours to avoid hunger and support proper energy levels.

Sample Meal Ideas for Athletes (Nutrition with Wendi) SM

Sample Meal Ideas for Athletes (Nutrition with Wendi) SM

Day Breakfast Snack 

 

Lunch Dinner 

 

Post-training  Pre-sleep snack
Day 1 (Protein + fiber rich food + fruit/veggie) (1-2 carb choices + 1-2 oz. protein) (Protein + whole grain + fruit/veggie) (Protein + whole grain + fruit/veggie) (Protein + Carb within 30-60 min of training  (Little protein + some carb, (60-min of bed))
Day 2 2 egg veggie omelet + whole grain English muffin with avocado1-2 cups of water Cucumber slices + String cheese Whole-grain turkey pesto wrap + pear + carrot sticks Grilled chicken sandwich on whole-grain bun, steam veggies, side salad with avocado, water and low-fat milk Banana, 8 oz of low-fat chocolate milk or 

 

3 oz. Cottage cheese with raspberries
Day 3 Fruit yogurt parfait·         1 cup berries

·         1 cup Greek yogurt

·         1/2 cup whole-grain oats

1-2 cups of water

 

Hummus + pepper slices Brown rice + black beans, 4 oz. baked or grilled chicken + spinach salad with vinaigrette or low-fat dressing 

1-2 cups of water

Large baked potato, broccoli in low-fat cheese, salsa, sliced turkey and salsa + 1 cup of berries 

1-2 cups of water

6 oz. of Greek yogurt + 1 c. berries 1 banana with 2 Tbsp. nut butter
Day 4 Fruit smoothie·         1 cup whole grain oats

·         4 oz of low-fat milk

·         1 cup blueberries + spinach

·         1 piece of whole grain toast

String cheese, whole grain crackers + apple Turkey tacos (whole grain tortilla, 3 oz. of 93% lean hamburger meat, cheese, lettuce, salsa, avocado) 

8 oz. cup of milk

1-2 cups of water

Whole-wheat English muffin with low-fat tuna + melted Swiss cheese + baked baby carrots, green beans + side fruit 

1-2 cups of water

1 cup of grapes, string cheese or hard boiled egg ½ whole grain turkey sandwich
Day 5 Whole grain bagel with 2 oz. of turkey, cheese and tomato 

 

1-2 cups of water

Kind bar, RX protein bar, nut bar, high protein granola bar + pineapple or raspberries Whole-grain pasta + 1 cup of broccoli + cherries 3 oz. of steak 8 oz of tart cherry juice + string cheese String cheese + pear slices
Day 6 Whole grain waffle with 2 Tbsp. almond butter, chia or flax seedOrange/Pear

 

1-2 cups of water

Whole grain rice cake + 1 Tbsp. nut butter + blueberries or banana slices Whole-wheat English muffin topped with marinara sauce, mozzarella cheese, grilled chicken, spinach + side of fruit 

1-2 cups of water

Hamburger + whole grain pasta, green beans + tomato spinach salad with feta cheese Whole grain waffle + 1 Tbsp. peanut butter + banana slices Greek yogurt + blueberries
Day 7 Whole-wheat pita + egg + low-fat cheese + sliced apple 

1-2 cups of water

Whole-wheat crackers, strawberries + string cheese Sautéed shrimp + asparagus, brown rice + blueberries 

1-2 cups of water or low-fat milk

Sautéed veggies, ground turkey, sweet potato + raspberries 

1-2 cups of water or low-fat milk

Chunky monkey smoothie (see recipe) Whole-wheat bread + 1 Tbsp. almond butter
Day 8 Oatmeal or overnight oats prepared with cow’s or soy milk + sliced almonds + peaches (see recipe) 

1-2 cups of water

Sugar snap peas, sliced bell peppers + hummus or low-fat ranch dip 3 oz. of salmon or (baked fish option) veggie salad, avocado, whole-wheat roll 

1-2 cups of water

Tomato basil wrap with tofu + sautéed mushrooms and onions + frozen grapes 

1-2 cups of water or 8 oz. of low-fat milk

2 Hard-boiled eggs + blueberries Banana soft-serve (combine ½ scoop protein powder + ice + frozen banana with 4 oz. of milk)

 


 

About the Authors

Erica Suter is a certified strength and conditioning coach in Baltimore, Maryland, as well as online for thousands of youth soccer players. She works with kids starting at the elementary level and going all the way up to the college level. She believes in long-term athletic development and the gradual progression of physical training for safe and effective results. She helps youth master the basic skills of balance, coordination, and stability, and ensures they blossom into powerful, fast and strong athlete when they’re older. She has written two books on youth strength and conditioning, Total Youth Soccer Fitness, and Total Youth Soccer Fitness 365, a year-round program for young soccer players to develop their speed, strength and conditioning.

Follow Erica on Twitter and Instagram and book a discovery call to become an online client HERE.

 

Wendi Irlbeck, MS, RDN is a registered dietitian nutritionist, health & fitness coach and former college athlete. Wendi utilizes evidence-based science to create nutrition programs for athletes to optimize performance, minimize health risks, and enhance recovery from training while focusing on injury prevention. Wendi partners with parents, sports performance staff, special needs and recreational athletes and organizations to eat and fuel for success. Wendi specializes in sports nutrition serving elite youth athletes as well as collegiate athletes teaching them the importance of getting back to the basics. She is a former sports dietitian for the Dairy Council of Michigan, is an adjunct instructor in Kinesiology, Health and Wellness Division at Lansing Community College in Lansing, Michigan. She earned both her B.S. and M.S. at the University of Wisconsin-Stout and has spent time learning from several professionals in the field along with an internship at the University of Florida. Wendi is based in East Lansing, Michigan with her own nutrition consulting business.

Follow Wendi on Twitter and Instagram and book a consultation to become a nutritional client HERE.